Travelling with Hugo Chavez, I soon understood the threat of Venezuela. At a farming co-operative in Lara state, people waited patiently and with good humour in the heat. Jugs of water and melon juice were passed around. A guitar was played; a woman, Katarina, stood and sang with a husky contralto.

"What did her words say?" I asked.

"That we are proud," was the reply.

The applause for her merged with the arrival of Chavez. Under one arm he carried a satchel bursting with books. He wore his big red shirt and greeted people by name, stopping to listen. What struck me was his capacity to listen.

But now he read. For almost two hours he read into the microphone from the stack of books beside him: Orwell, Dickens, Tolstoy, Zola, Hemingway, Chomsky, Neruda: a page here, a line or two there. People clapped and whistled as he moved from author to author.

Then farmers took the microphone and told him what they knew, and what they needed; one ancient face, carved it seemed from a nearby banyan, made a long, critical speech on the subject of irrigation; Chavez took notes.

Wine is grown here, a dark Syrah type grape. "John, John, come up here," said El Presidente, having watched me fall asleep in the heat and the depths of Oliver Twist.

"He likes red wine," Chavez told the cheering, whistling audience, and presented me with a bottle of "vino de la gente". My few words in bad Spanish brought whistles and laughter.

Watching Chavez with la gente made sense of a man who promised, on coming to power, that his every move would be subject to the will of the people. In eight years, Chavez won eight elections and referendums: a world record. He was electorally the most popular head of state in the Western Hemisphere, probably in the world.

Every major chavista reform was voted on, notably a new constitution of which 71 per cent of the people approved each of the 396 articles that enshrined unheard of freedoms, such as Article 123, which for the first time recognised the human rights of mixed-race and black people, of whom Chavez was one.

One of his tutorials on the road quoted a feminist writer: "Love and solidarity are the same." His audiences understood this well and expressed themselves with dignity, seldom with deference. Ordinary people regarded Chavez and his government as their first champions: as theirs.

This was especially true of the indigenous, mestizos and Afro-Venezuelans, who had been held in historic contempt by Chavez's immediate predecessors and by those who today live far from the barrios, in the mansions and penthouses of East Caracas, who commute to Miami where their banks are and who regard themselves as "white". They are the powerful core of what the media calls "the opposition".

When I met this class, in suburbs called Country Club, in homes appointed with low chandeliers and bad portraits, I recognised them. They could be white South Africans, the petite bourgeoisie of Constantia and Sandton, pillars of the cruelties of apartheid.

Cartoonists in the Venezuelan press, most of which are owned by an oligarchy and oppose the government, portrayed Chavez as an ape. A radio host referred to "the monkey". In the private universities, the verbal currency of the children of the well-off is often racist abuse of those whose shacks are just visible through the pollution.

Although identity politics are all the rage in the pages of liberal newspapers in the West, race and class are two words almost never uttered in the mendacious "coverage" of Washington's latest, most naked attempt to grab the world's greatest source of oil and reclaim its "backyard".

For all the chavistas' faults - such as allowing the Venezuelan economy to become hostage to the fortunes of oil and never seriously challenging big capital and corruption - they brought social justice and pride to millions of people and they did it with unprecedented democracy.

"Of the 92 elections that we've monitored," said former President Jimmy Carter, whose Carter Centre is a respected monitor of elections around the world, "I would say the election process in Venezuela is the best in the world." By way of contrast, said Carter, the US election system, with its emphasis on campaign money, "is one of the worst".

In extending the franchise to a parallel people's state of communal authority, based in the poorest barrios, Chavez described Venezuelan democracy as "our version of Rousseau's idea of popular sovereignty".

In Barrio La Linea, seated in her tiny kitchen, Beatrice Balazo told me her children were the first generation of the poor to attend a full day's school and be given a hot meal and to learn music, art and dance. "I have seen their confidence blossom like flowers," she said.

In Barrio La Vega, I listened to a nurse, Mariella Machado, a black woman of 45 with a wicked laugh, address an urban land council on subjects ranging from homelessness to illegal war. That day, they were launching Mision Madres de Barrio, a programme aimed at poverty among single mothers. Under the constitution, women have the right to be paid as carers, and can borrow from a special women's bank. Now the poorest housewives get the equivalent of $200 a month.

In a room lit by a single fluorescent tube, I met Ana Lucia Ferandez, aged 86, and Mavis Mendez, aged 95. A mere 33-year-old, Sonia Alvarez, had come with her two children. Once, none of them could read and write; now they were studying mathematics. For the first time in its history, Venezuela has almost 100 per cent literacy.

This is the work of Mision Robinson, which was designed for adults and teenagers previously denied an education because of poverty. Mision Ribas gives everyone the opportunity of a secondary education, called a bachillerato.(The names Robinson and Ribas refer to Venezuelan independence leaders from the 19th century).

In her 95 years, Mavis Mendez had seen a parade of governments, mostly vassals of Washington, preside over the theft of billions of dollars in oil spoils, much of it flown to Miami. "We didn't matter in a human sense," she told me. "We lived and died without real education and running water, and food we couldn't afford. When we fell ill, the weakest died. Now I can read and write my name and so much more; and whatever the rich and the media say, we have planted the seeds of true democracy and I have the joy of seeing it happen."

In 2002, during a Washington-backed coup, Mavis's sons and daughters and grandchildren and great-grandchildren joined hundreds of thousands who swept down from the barrios on the hillsides and demanded the army remained loyal to Chavez.

"The people rescued me," Chavez told me. "They did it with the media against me, preventing even the basic facts of what happened. For popular democracy in heroic action, I suggest you look no further."

Since Chavez's death in 2013, his successor Nicolas Maduro has shed his derisory label in the Western press as a "former bus driver" and become Saddam Hussein incarnate. His media abuse is ridiculous. On his watch, the slide in the price of oil has caused hyper inflation and played havoc with prices in a society that imports almost all its food; yet, as the journalist and film-maker Pablo Navarrete reported this week, Venezuela is not the catastrophe it has been painted. "There is food everywhere," he wrote. "I have filmed lots of videos of food in markets [all over Caracas] ... it's Friday night and the restaurants are full."

In 2018, Maduro was re-elected President. A section of the opposition boycotted the election, a tactic tried against Chavez. The boycott failed: 9,389,056 people voted; sixteen parties participated and six candidates stood for the presidency. Maduro won 6,248,864 votes, or 67.84 per cent."

read the rest here: http://johnpilger.com/articles/the-war-on-venezuela-is-built-on-lies

Views: 48

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I hope this is correct and the people aren't suffering like is being reported.

Hard to know the truth these days it seems like you have to cut it out of all the lies.

RSS

Latest Activity

Old Denmark posted videos
21 minutes ago
Mrs. Tif Morgan posted a discussion

Things The Media Does Not Talk About: US Border

Things The Media Does Not Talk About: US Border- YouTube…See More
2 hours ago
Mrs. Tif Morgan replied to Mrs. Tif Morgan's discussion Dems Introduce Bill Forcing Men to Report to Police When They Masturbate
"Ahh what?"
2 hours ago
DHUK posted a video

What They Dont Want You to See in The NZ Mosque Shooting Video - And Its Not "CGI"

No further explanation Required. Download, Repost. Share wildly while you can. MAKE VIRAL! This video may see the end of my channel But WTF huh? The truth pr...
2 hours ago
canadianjoe favorited the mighty bull's photo
2 hours ago
cheeki kea favorited Old Denmark's video
3 hours ago
cheeki kea replied to Chris of the family Masters's discussion ALERT: Brighteon.com video platform under extreme threat from internet infrastructure providers, forced to delete all New Zealand shooting videos, essentially “at gunpoint” by the globalist controller
"There's no solution in locking the stable door after the horse has bolted. That just makes people curious, and perpetuates the dilemma, there's a degree of anger out there now, but nowhere to address it. This disaster has only served to…"
4 hours ago
cheeki kea commented on Raz Putin's video
Thumbnail

Zio-Connections to the New Zealand Mosque Massacre

"It's not only local gun rights at risk here. The hoax will be used as an example for gun control in a global push to disarm people everywhere. One day you may not be able to buy Any firearm without a license, thats why I got one now, It can be…"
5 hours ago
cheeki kea replied to Chris of the family Masters's discussion Colorado: Contact Needed! - Senate Passes “Red Flag” Legislation on Second Reading
"'Staying' alive could be taken into consideration first, by Everyone. "
6 hours ago
Chris of the family Masters replied to Chris of the family Masters's discussion Colorado: Contact Needed! - Senate Passes “Red Flag” Legislation on Second Reading
"When you become alive, such rules would not apply to you. http://12160.info/m/blogpost?id=2649739%3ABlogPost%3A1896720"
8 hours ago
Chris of the family Masters posted videos
8 hours ago
Maasanova commented on Raz Putin's video
11 hours ago
Maasanova commented on Raz Putin's video
Thumbnail

Zio-Connections to the New Zealand Mosque Massacre

"I can't believe he is still on JewTube"
12 hours ago
Maasanova favorited Chris of the family Masters's video
12 hours ago
the mighty bull posted a status
"I'm off to play Bitlife and Grand Theft Auto"
12 hours ago
Maasanova posted a video

Def Leppard - Personal Jesus

Music video by Def Leppard performing Personal Jesus (Remix). © 2018 Bludgeon Riffola http://vevo.ly/qRMgiW
12 hours ago

Please remember this website is supported by your donations...

© 2019   Created by truth.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

content and site copyright 12160.info 2007-2015 - all rights reserved. unless otherwise noted