Now who came up with the name? "local fluff". It is far from fluff. It might mean the end to all life on earth. That is if things continue to happen as they have been going. This cloud is highly radioactive and very magnetic What protects us from this "Fluff" is the magnetic field of the sun and the earth's magnetic shield. But..... what is not being told... if we have a pole shift of our magnetic poles our shield will be down. "Scotty, status report. How much longer until you get those shields up"? I think if star treck. "Captian! I am doing the best I can".

 

This Local Fluff squishes the magnetic field we are being protected by the sun. Meaning it does not extend out as fas as it would normally. 

Our magnetic shield would be down until the earth settles down a bit after the Pole shift. and you though we only had to worry about a solar flair during this time? Not so. 

Read what NASA says about this FLUFF. It's nothing to laugh about. 

 

Voyager Makes an Interstellar Discovery

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2009/23dec_voy...

 

 

December 23, 2009: The solar system is passing through an interstellar cloud that physics says should not exist. In the Dec. 24th issue of Nature, a team of scientists reveal how NASA's Voyager spacecraft have solved the mystery.

 

"Using data from Voyager, we have discovered a strong magnetic field just outside the solar system," explains lead author Merav Opher, a NASA Heliophysics Guest Investigator from George Mason University. "This magnetic field holds the interstellar cloud together and solves the long-standing puzzle of how it can exist at all."

Right: Voyager flies through the outer bounds of the heliosphere en route to interstellar space. A strong magnetic field reported by Opher et al in the Dec. 24, 2009, issue of Nature is delineated in yellow. Image copyright 2009, The American Museum of Natural History. [larger image]

The discovery has implications for the future when the solar system will eventually bump into other, similar clouds in our arm of the Milky Way galaxy.

 

Astronomers call the cloud we're running into now the Local Interstellar Cloud or "Local Fluff" for short. It's about 30 light years wide and contains a wispy mixture of hydrogen and helium atoms at a temperature of 6000 C. The existential mystery of the Fluff has to do with its surroundings. About 10 million years ago, a cluster of supernovas exploded nearby, creating a giant bubble of million-degree gas. The Fluff is completely surrounded by this high-pressure supernova exhaust and should be crushed or dispersed by it.

"The observed temperature and density of the local cloud do not provide enough pressure to resist the 'crushing action' of the hot gas around it," says Opher.

So how does the Fluff survive? The Voyagers have found an answer.

"Voyager data show that the Fluff is much more strongly magnetized than anyone had previously suspected—between 4 and 5 microgauss*," says Opher. "This magnetic field can provide the extra pressure required to resist destruction."

 

NASA's two Voyager probes have been racing out of the solar system for more than 30 years. They are now beyond the orbit of Pluto and on the verge of entering interstellar space—but they are not there yet.

"The Voyagers are not actually inside the Local Fluff," says Opher. "But they are getting close and can sense what the cloud is like as they approach it."

The Fluff is held at bay just beyond the edge of the solar system by the sun's magnetic field, which is inflated by solar wind into a magnetic bubble more than 10 billion km wide. Called the "heliosphere," this bubble acts as a shield that helps protect the inner solar system from galactic cosmic rays and interstellar clouds. The two Voyagers are located in the outermost layer of the heliosphere, or "heliosheath," where the solar wind is slowed by the pressure of interstellar gas.

Voyager 1 entered the heliosheath in Dec. 2004; Voyager 2 followed almost 3 years later in Aug. 2007. These crossings were key to Opher et al's discovery.

 

http://science.nasa.gov/media/medialibrary/2009/12/22/23dec_voyager...

 

 

Right: The anatomy of the heliosphere. Since this illustration was made, Voyager 2 has joined Voyager 1 inside the heliosheath, a thick outer layer where the solar wind is slowed by the pressure of interstellar gas. Credit: NASA/Walt Feimer. [larger image]

The size of the heliosphere is determined by a balance of forces: Solar wind inflates the bubble from the inside while the Local Fluff compresses it from the outside. Voyager's crossings into the heliosheath revealed the approximate size of the heliosphere and, thus, how much pressure the Local Fluff exerts. A portion of that pressure is magnetic and corresponds to the ~5 microgauss Opher's team has reported in Nature.

The fact that the Fluff is strongly magnetized means that other clouds in the galactic neighborhood could be, too. Eventually, the solar system will run into some of them, and their strong magnetic fields could compress the heliosphere even more than it is compressed now. Additional compression could allow more cosmic rays to reach the inner solar system, possibly affecting terrestrial climate and the ability of astronauts to travel safely through space. On the other hand, astronauts wouldn't have to travel so far because interstellar space would be closer than ever. These events would play out on time scales of tens to hundreds of thousands of years, which is how long it takes for the solar system to move from one cloud to the next.

"There could be interesting times ahead!" says Opher.

To read the original research, look in the Dec. 24, 2009, issue of Nature for Opher et al's article, "A strong, highly-tilted interstellar magnetic field near the Solar System."

 

Local Interstellar Cloud

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_Interstellar_Cloud

 

The Local Interstellar Cloud (or Local Fluff) is the interstellar cloud roughly 30 light years across through which the Earth's solar system is currently moving. The Solar System is thought to have entered the Local Interstellar Cloud at some time between 44,000 and 150,000 years ago and is expected to remain within it for another 10,000 to 20,000 years. The cloud has a temperature of about 6000 °C,[1] about the same temperature as the surface of the Sun. It is very tenuous, with 0.1 atoms per cubic centimeter; approximately one-fifth the density of the galactic interstellar medium (0.5 atoms/cc), but twice that of the gas in the Local Bubble (0.05 atoms/cc). The Local Bubble is an area of low-density in the interstellar medium, with the Local Cloud a small, more dense area. In comparison, Earth's atmosphere at STP has 2.7 × 1019 molecules per cubic centimeter.

The cloud is flowing outwards from the Scorpius-Centaurus Association, a stellar association that is a star-forming region.[2]

The cloud formed where the Local Bubble and the Loop I Bubble met. The Sun is embedded in the Local Fluff, as are a few other nearby stars including Alpha CentauriAltairVegaFomalhaut, andArcturus.

The Local Interstellar Cloud's potential effects on Earth are prevented by the solar wind and the Sun's magnetic field.[3] This interaction with the heliosphere is under study by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), a NASA satellite mapping the boundary between the Solar System and interstellar space.

 

"Using data from Voyager, we have discovered a strong magnetic field just outside the solar system," explained Merav Opher, a NASA Heliophysics Guest Investigator from George Mason University. "This magnetic field holds the interstellar cloud together ["The Fluff"] and solves the long-standing puzzle of how it can exist at all."

The Fluff is much more strongly magnetized than anyone had previously suspected," Opher said. "This magnetic field can provide the extra pressure required to resist destruction."

Opher and colleagues detail the discovery in the Dec. 24 issue of the journal Nature.

NASA's two Voyager probes have been racing out of the solar system for more than 30 years. They are now beyond the orbit of Pluto and on the verge of entering interstellar space. During the 1990s, Voyager 1 became the farthest manmade object in space.

The Voyager craft, racing in opposite directions, have revealed among other things that the bubble around our solar system is squashed.

"The Voyagers are not actually inside the Local Fluff," Opher said. "But they are getting close and can sense what the cloud is like as they approach it."

The Fluff is held at bay just beyond the edge of the solar system by the sun's magnetic field, which is inflated by solar wind into a magnetic bubble more than 6.2 billion miles wide (10 billion km). Called the "heliosphere," this bubble protect the inner solar system from galactic cosmic rays and interstellar clouds. The two Voyagers are located in the outermost layer of the heliosphere, or "heliosheath," where the solar wind is slowed by the pressure of interstellar gas.

Voyager 1 entered the heliosheath in December 2004. Voyager 2 followed in August 2007. These crossings provided key data for the new study.

Other interstellar clouds might also be magnetized, Opher and colleagues figure. And we could eventually run into some of them.

"Their strong magnetic fields could compress the heliosphere even more than it is compressed now," according to NASA. "Additional compression could allow more cosmic rays to reach the inner solar system, possibly affecting terrestrial climate and the ability of astronauts to travel safely through space."

 

 

What Opher fails to elucidate a Boeing whistleblower does:

"I work for a NASA contractor and handle the video conferencing sessions between JSC and other facilities. Everybody always wants to see a link. Well, everything talked about in these vc's is top secret - so there's obviously not a link. I love my family and need my job so I'm not gonna tell you much that would endanger those either. I work for Boeing. All I can tell you is there is a LOT of interesting shit happening. The moon is NOT crashing - but it doesn't need to. There is a reason so many are sending birds up to watch the Sun - and it's not cause we just would like to know more about the Sun.

The Sun is already reacting to 'forces' we can't see.

Everybody assumes NASA has all the answers and that there are things they know for sure which aren't being disclosed. The problem is, most of what is being discussed is NOT set in stone and NASA, nor ESA or the others know for certain either what will happen - in some instances - and even less when.

Things moving through space can hit each other. When they do, it's hard to know what will happen because those spin offs can hit other 'things' we may not see yet - or - may think we see but aren't sure of the mass or composition.

NASA isn't sure of everything it believes may be happening. Something is happening and many who have the ability to send birds up to look are also trying to figure out just what "is" real.

[...]

I am learning how to adjust to a lack of electrons in house wiring for some time. [due to CMEs interacting with this magnetized cloud, potentially creating globally-effective and/or continual EMPs.]


Everyone at NASA has a family somewhere. They're not a bunch of govt bought robots - they have feelings. They fear what can happen. But they have to pay their bills like all of us. They have to keep money coming into the budget. Many WANT to keep money coming hoping that they can figure out what is fact - and THEN they would LIKE to open up about it..... that's what I hear in the halls - NOT in official conferences. But - it is a very vicious circle folks.

Again, this is out there. Days. There is a 'domino' effect because of how our electrical grid is designed. It has safeguards which actually take it down - in segments - automatically in order to keep from frying things... but the components of what those automatic systems are supposed to protect are not protected from EMP and/or huge static loads to ground. [which would cause a big spark] I'm not an EE so not sure what that means. So when the system tries to protect itself - it can cascade - quickly. But if certain parts of the system get damaged - again this is out there - then it can take years to replace them. Problem is, the companies who make this stuff don't have enough raw materials on hand - right now - to make them all. Some of them don't even have back up power sources.... they are 'commercial' suppliers! Think about it. Really think about it.

I've actually said about as much as I can. For us, we are fortunate to have a small place between Houston and Dallas with a few acres. We have a well - hand well and wind mill. I have tools and can work with my hands. I have a few solar panels just to charge some batteries for small conveniences like small led lights at night. Forget much more than that. We have seeds for only a few basic veggies. Think about living in the late 1800s for a while and you'll be on my line of thinking. Is it enough or will it work - I don't know. How soon may it be needed? I don't know and I think anybody who says they do know is pulling our legs - UNTIL about 30-40 hours before it happens. Will an announcement be made? I don't know but I don't think so - too many variables and too much communication to be done with critical agencies to at least TRY to save some stuff. How fast am I working on this? I have been for a year and am nearly finished with what I have 'planned' to try to get together. Hope this has been helpful.

[...]

There IS public speculation out there about something which has a timeline and affects our solar system. But - NASA has not confirmed that they see it. Did I say that right ??? They also don't really know how it 'could' affect our system cause things 'could' happen which would change 'its' timeline - if it exists.

Old birds aren't savable. Even shutting them down won't help.

It's not about something hitting the Earth.

[...]

Not years. Again, this is out there - look at how long the Sun was quiet passed when everyone thought it would be quiet. Like I said, NASA doesn't always know what it thinks it knows. Look at the 'very public' amount of data being made available by SOHO and other systems which are still up every day on the net. That stuff would not be available if NASA really didn't want the public to have 'the ability to know' what is occurring. It's obvious that something is occurring - and more frequently. That's public info - not necessarily knowledge - but it's info that is there for the seeing and reading.

All I can say.

 

[...]

This is likely going to be my last post. I had a long talk with my wife and family this weekend. For reasons I cannot explain well enough to suit the proof requirements of many here - I have decided that we will be making our move out to our property in June of this year. I will be quitting my job at Boeing - not just leaving without a trace because that would cause folks to want to find out where I had gone.

 

This post - is the closest to what I was trying to point to about the solar maximum PLUS other objects which NASA knows will affect our solar system or, at least, have a damn good chance of doing so. However, since this mass of objects and particles is so out there in distance and spread out so far - there is simply no way to know how much or when they will either affect the Sun - or our planet directly. No way to know. Because of that - no warnings other than articles like this one which point right to a known - potential - serious - problem.

The conferences I hear are between scientists of various fields working at what in 'secret level topics' would be the kindergarten level. That's all I have clearance to hear. If the topic or conversation goes above that - my audio link gets blanked out. Many meetings about this subject we can't hear from the beginning - we just set up the links and monitor on scopes for stability. There are at least 12 levels of clearance above mine - and that's only the ones I know of.

So, long story short, I took some time this weekend and we made a decision. I may be early - by a few months or so... but i don't think so. Posting this thread helped me convince myself that acting was better than reacting. There just won't be enough time when it happens. There isn't a clock on this either but I want to be at our place by end of June.... that's my gut feeling. If I'm wrong, then we spend our savings and start over in a few years - no real biggie in light of the difference if I'm right. And I believe I'm right to move by June.

Past that, I don't know what to say folks. Everyone has to take my post and others and form their own decision. From here out, you'll likely only see me post from my iPhone. I know when I turn in my notice they will release me immediately - that's the norm in security sensitive areas.

I will turn in my notice this coming Friday. That will give us time to do lots of things needed before we make the move. God bless you all - no matter what you think. Trust your instinct - [mine] has always served me well."

Full PDF of the whistleblower document is available at: The Coming: A Boeing Whistleblower's Warning. Will a Massive Celest...

 

http://www.4everseeds.com/ss/warning.pdf

 

* To read the original research, look in the Dec. 24, 2009, issue of Nature for Opher et al's article, "A strong, highly-tilted interstellar magnetic field near the Solar ...."

ftp://space.mit.edu/pub/plasma/publications/jdr_opher_nature/jdr_op...

 

This file contains Supplementary Data, Supplementary Table 1, a Supplementary Discussion, Supplementary References and Supplementary Figures S1-S4 with Legends: Supplementary Information - Download PDF file (696KB)

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v462/n7276/extref/nature08567-...

 

The Dynamic Heliosphere by Marius Potgieter, Stefan Ferreira and Du Toit Strauss, Unit for Space Physics (USP), North-West University

http://solarnet.obspm.fr/IAGA2/IAGA2-Potgieter-etal.pdf

 

Global Observations of the Interstellar Interaction from the Inters...

http://www.scribd.com/doc/31151740/Global-Observations-of-the-Inter...

 

The Physics and Chemistry of the Interstellar Medium

http://www.scribd.com/doc/30997990/The-Physics-and-Chemistry-of-the...

 

NASA Interstellar Boundary Boundary Explorer (IBEX) Spacecraft Program

http://ibex.swri.edu/

 

Future May Rely on a Ribbon

http://covertress.blogspot.com/2010/02/future-may-rely-on-ribbon.html

 

 

 

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Very interesting. This jibes completely with the EU model. I suspect NASA knows this as well. Not only is this the smoking gun for a paradigm shift, but also shows a protagonist to the electrical model of our own extra-solar power consumption. For society, it means an imminent downfall of technology, depending upon the cathodic effects or upheaval incurred by the positive effects upon our own electrical medium. If of a negative nature then the Sun will protect us without a problem, but an overload of positive electron cascades could leave all of us up the proverbial creek, with no elctrical paddle.

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