by Dr Hulda Clark


Recipes for Natural Body Products
You can use just borax (like 20 Mule Team BoraxTM) and washing soda (like Arm & Hammer Super Washing SodaTM) for all types of cleaning including your body, laundry, dishes and
your house! You don’t need all of those products you see in
commercials for each special task!
Even if you have dry skin, difficult hair or some other unique requirement, just pure borax will satisfy these needs. A part of every skin problem is due to the toxic elements found in the soaps themselves. For instance aluminum is commonly added as a “skin moisturizer”. It does this by impregnating the skin and attracting water, giving the illusion of moist skin. In fact you simply have moist aluminum stuck in your skin which your immune system must remove. While borax won’t directly heal your skin or complexion, it does replace the agents that are causing damage, so that healing can occur.

Borax Liquid Soap
Empty 1 gallon jug
1/8 cup borax powder
Plastic funnel

Funnel the borax into the jug, fill with cold tap water. Shake a few times. Let settle. In a few minutes you can pour off the clear part into dispenser bottles. This is the soap!

Easier way: use any bottle, pour borax powder to a depth of a ½ inch or so. Add water. Shake. When you have used it down to the undissolved granules, add more water and shake again. Add more borax when the undissolved granules get low.

Keep a dispenser by the kitchen sink, bathroom sink, and shower. It does not contain aluminum as regular detergents and soaps do, and which probably contribute to Alzheimer’s disease. It does not contain PCBs as many commercial and health food varieties do. It does not contain cobalt (the blue or green granules) which causes heart disease and draws cancer parasites to the skin. Commercial detergents and non-soaps are simply not safe. Switch to homemade bar soap and borax for all your tasks! Borax inhibits the bacterial enzyme urease and is therefore antibacterial. It may even clear your skin of blemishes and stop your scalp from itching.

For Laundry
Borax (½ cup per load). It is the main ingredient of nonchlorine bleach and has excellent cleaning power without fading colors. Your regular laundry soap may contain PCBs, aluminum, cobalt and other chemicals. These get rubbed into your skin constantly as you wear your clothing. For bleaching (only do this occasionally) use original chlorine bleach (not “new improved” or “with special brighteners”, and so forth). Don’t use chlorine if there is an ill person in the house. For getting out stubborn dirt at collars, scrub with homemade bar soap first; for stains, try grain alcohol, vinegar, baking soda.

For Dishes
Don’t believe your eyes when you see the commercials where the smiling person pulls a shining dish out of greasy suds. Any dish soap that you use should be safe enough to eat because nothing rinses off clean. Regular dish detergents, including health brands, are now polluted with PCBs. They also contain harmful chemicals. Use borax for your dishes. Or use paper plates and plastic (not styrofoam) cups.

In The Dishwasher
Use 2 tsp. borax powder pre-dissolved in water. If you use too much it will leave a film on your dishes. Use vinegar in the rinse cycle.

In The Sink
Use a dishpan in the sink. Use ¼ cup borax and add a minimum of water. Also keep a bit of dry borax in a saucer by the sink for scouring. Don’t use any soap at all for dishes that aren’t greasy and can be washed under the faucet with nothing but running water. Throw away your old sponge or brush or cloth because it may be PCB contaminated. Start each day by sterilizing your sponge (it harbors Salmonella) or with a new one while the used one dries for three full days. Clean greasy pots and pans with a paper towel first. Then use homemade bar soap.

Shampoo
Borax liquid is ready to use as shampoo, too. It does not lather but goes right to work removing sweat and soil without stripping your color or natural oils. It inhibits scalp bacteria and stops flaking and itching. Hair gets squeaky clean so quickly (just a few squirts does it) that you might think nothing has happened! You will soon be accustomed to non-lathery soap. Rinse very thoroughly because you should leave your scalp slightly acidic. Take a pint container to the shower with you. Put ¼ tsp. citric (not ascorbic) acid crystals (see Sources) in it. For long hair use a quart of rinse. Only citric acid is strong enough to get the borax out, lemon juice and vinegar are not. After shampooing, fill the container with water and rinse. Rinse your whole body, too, since citric acid is also anti-bacterial. All hair shampoo penetrates the eye lids and gets into the eyes although you do not feel it. It is important to use this natural rinse to neutralize the shampoo in your eyes. (Some people have stated that citric acid makes their hair curlier or reddens it. If this is undesirable, use only half as much citric acid.) Citric acid also
conditions and gives body and sheen to hair.

Homemade Soap
A small plastic dishpan, about 10″ x 12″
A glass or enamel 2-quart sauce pan
1 can of lye (sodium hydroxide), 12 ounces
3 pounds of lard (BHT and BHA are OK here)
Plastic gloves
Water


Pour 3 cups of very cold water (refrigerate water overnight first) into the 2-quart saucepan.
Slowly and carefully add the lye, a little bit at a time, stirring it with a wooden or plastic utensil. (Use plastic gloves for this; test them for holes first.) Do not breathe the vapor or lean over the container or have children nearby. Above all use no metal. The mixture will get very hot. In olden days, a sassafras branch was used to stir, imparting a fragrance and insect deterrent for mosquitoes, lice, fleas, ticks.
Let cool at least one hour in a safe place. Meanwhile, the unwrapped lard should be warming up to room temperature in the plastic dishpan.
Slowly and carefully, pour the lye solution into the dishpan with the lard. The lard will melt. Mix thoroughly, at least15 minutes, until it looks like thick pudding.
Let it set until the next morning; then cut it into bars. It will get harder after a few days. Then package. If you wish to make soap based on olive oil, use about 48 ounces. It may need to harden for a week.

Liquid Soap
Make chips from your homemade soap cake. Add enough hot water to dissolve. Add citric acid to balance the pH (7 to 8). If you do not, this soap may be too harsh for your skin.


http://livingnetwork.co.za/drclarknetwork/recipes/borax-soap/

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Comment by DTOM on April 19, 2018 at 6:14am
Comment by Marklar on October 7, 2010 at 10:03pm
NOTE: Boric acid by itself can be a bit harsh, if you can find a source of finely ground salt (another desiccant) mixing it 50/50 with your borax can dilute it a bit without making it ineffective.

Be sure to wear a dust mask while using a broom to work the powder into the carpet as the process will create a bit of a "dust" cloud and ventilate the house well with fans while you work. A lung full of this stiff won't really hurt you but you'll be very very thirsty by the time you are done without the dust mask.

Make sure you reach close to 100% of the carpet by moving furniture to treat the carpet beneath it.

In areas with tile or wood floors you can use a turkey baster with the shaft cut down to three or four inches to puff a little bit of the borax around the bottom of the base boards where flea eggs can accumulate. This shortened turkey baster can also be used to apply a bit of powder in the cracks of couches and behind furniture that you decide you just can't move.

Along with treating your home with the Borax, treating your yard with nematodes is a good idea as well and should be done at approximately the same time. Nematodes are a microscopic worm that preys on insect larvae (including fleas). This may not be necessary in drier climates though. Does a portion of your lawn stay green in summer because of a large shade tree making it a favorite resting place for pets? That might be a good place to apply nematodes even if the rest of your lawn goes brown and dry in summer.
Comment by Marklar on October 7, 2010 at 9:45pm
Flea Control With Boric Acid (Borax)

You see your kitties and fido scratching feverishly and you see those little pesky fleas jumping onto the furniture, carpets and floor. Your first reaction is most likely to reach for the bottle of flea spray that you have purchased. But wait! Do you want to spray toxic pesticides all round your house. You don’t have to do that. You have a better and safer choice and that is: flea control with boric acid.

Boric acid for fleas - how effective is it?

Boric acid is one of the oldest, low-toxicity inorganic minerals. It’s inexpensive but it posses insecticidal, fungicidal, and herbicidal properties and it is the “secret ingredient” in many of the commercial products used for insects control.



Boric acid is generally known as a desiccant. It acts as a flea killer by removing moisture from the insects’ body causing severe dehydration and eventually death. It’s highly effective in extremely small amount and it’s able to maintain its potency for a long period of time. It’s odorless and unlike others insecticides, it is non-repellant to insects. This means that insects will still return to the treated areas repeatedly until they are killed.

Fleas and its developing larvae and cocoons tend to gather and multiple in dark places away from light such as in carpets, in cracks and crevices on floors and walls and in the wells of furniture. Hence the obvious places to start flea control with boric acid will be these areas.

Here is how you can make use of boric acid effectively in your in-house treatment for fleas.

1. Firstly, clear all areas that require treatment.
Remove all things around the areas to be treated such as shoes, toys from the carpeted areas.

2. Begin your “boric acid carpet treatment for fleas” by first vacuuming all the carpeted surfaces thoroughly to remove dirt and dust. This will enable the boric acid powder to act more effectively. All cushions should also be removed from furniture. Clean and vacuum the walls as well.

3. Sprinkle the boric acid powder lightly over all carpeted areas including closet floors and under furniture. Pay special attention to favorite resting places of your pets, as these are likely to be areas where fleas are abundant.

4. Using a push broom, slowly brush the boric acid powder into the carpets. Brush in one direction to evenly spread out or distribute the powder. Then using a slow back and forth motion to work powder deeper into the carpets until no visible powder remains on the surface.

5. To make use of boric acid powder to kill fleas on furniture, simply sprinkle the boric acid powder very lightly over the furniture especially the wells. Using a hand brush, work the powder deep into the wells until powder disappears. Vacuum off all excess powder from the furniture.

Boric acid kills fleas larvae, but is not as effective at killing the adults, so you may not see the results for 2-6 weeks while the adult population dies off. As such, it is helpful to vacuum frequently to kill the adult fleas during the initial weeks after application.

Normal vacuuming can resumed 24-38 hours following application. All vacuum bags are to be removed and discarded immediately after vacuuming. The boric acid remains active for a long period of time even up to a year. However reapplication is necessary following cleaning of the treated carpets or rugs.

Beside the mild eye, skin and throat irritation that may be caused by the use of boric acid, it is considered a relatively safe chemical for flea control in homes. With careful application, boric acid offers a safe and effective alternative without the indoor air problems associated with sprays. In fact, with proper care and adhering to label directions and precautions, the exposure to any associated risk is minimal.

There are many commercial products available containing boric acid that you can readily buy to commence flea control treatment at home. Here are the 2 more popular ones:
Comment by XhackedbyNSA on October 7, 2010 at 9:36pm
I saw this same posting on Steve Quayle's site at lunch today.
If you follow the namesake site, Alex Jones (who broadcasts on 12.160 MHZ), you may remember the Hardin, MT. issues...that was Steve Quayle that broke the story, that came to Mr. Jones's attention.
Several 'infowarriors' forwarded this story to Alex, and perhaps he and Steve share info...
ANYWAY, I think that it is interesting that a Steve Quayle headline would end up over at 12160!
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