Your inalienable rights

Every man and woman on earth is born with certain inalienable rights. These rights cannot be taken away by anyone unless you allow them to.

Governments do everything they can to strip us of our Rights. So it is up to each one of us to know what our inalienable rights are, and then to stand up against anyone trying to take them away.

Common Law protects our rights and gives us the tools to defend them against any attempt to destroy them.

These are our Inalienable Rights

  1. To act in self-defense (personal, family, innocents, nation).
  2. To own and carry weapons for self-defense and for ensuring that the nation remains free.
  3. To own and control private property (land, money, personal items, intellectual property, etc.)
  4. To earn a living and keep the fruit of one’s labor.
  5. To freely migrate within the country or to leave the country.
  6. To worship—or not worship—God in the manner one chooses.
  7. To associate with—or disassociate from—any person or group.
  8. To express any idea through print, voice, banner, or other media.
  9. To be secure in one’s home, papers, and person against unwarranted searches and seizures (privacy).
  10. To be advised of the charges, in the event of arrest.
  11. To have a judge determine if the accused should be held for trial or for punishment.
  12. To be tried by a jury of one’s peers and face one’s accuser, in the event of being charged with a crime.
  13. To be tried by a jury of one’s peers, in the event of a suit in which the disputed amount is substantive.
  14. To suffer no cruel or unusual punishment.
  15. To establish, monitor, control, and petition our servant government to help secure the above rights.
  16. To abolish said government, when it becomes destructive of these rights.             Source

List of amendments to the United States Constitution

Thirty-three amendments to the United States Constitution have been proposed by the United States Congress and sent to the states for ratification since the Constitution was put into operation on March 4, 1789. Twenty-seven of these, having been ratified by the requisite number of states, are part of the Constitution. The first ten amendments were adopted and ratified simultaneously and are known collectively as the Bill of Rights. Six amendments adopted by Congress and sent to the states have not been ratified by the required number of states. Four of these amendments are still pending, one is closed and has failed by its own terms, and one is closed and has failed by the terms of the resolution proposing it. All 33 amendments are listed and detailed in the tables below.

Article Five of the United States Constitution details the two-step process for amending the nation's frame of government. Amendments must be properly proposed and ratified before becoming operative. This process was designed to strike a balance between the excesses of constant change and inflexibility.[1]

An amendment may be proposed and sent to the states for ratification by either:

To become part of the Constitution, an amendment must be ratified by three-fourths of the states (38 since 1959) by either (as determined by Congress):

  • The legislatures of three-fourths of the states; or
  • State ratifying conventions in three-fourths of the states.[3][4] The only amendment to be ratified through the state convention method thus far is the Twenty-first Amendment in 1933. That amendment is also the only one that explicitly repeals an earlier one, the Eighteenth Amendment (ratified in 1919), establishing the prohibition of alcohol.[5]

When a constitutional amendment is sent to the states for ratification, the Archivist of the United States is charged with responsibility for administering the ratification process under the provisions of 1 U.S.C. § 106b.[6] Then, upon being properly ratified, the archivist issues a certificate proclaiming that an amendment has become an operative part of the Constitution.[3]

Beginning in the early 20th century, Congress has usually, but not always, stipulated that an amendment must be ratified by the required number of states within seven years from the date of its submission to the states in order to become part of the Constitution. Congress's authority to set a ratification deadline was affirmed in 1939 by the United States Supreme Court in Coleman v. Miller (307 U.S. 433).[4]

Approximately 11,770 proposals to amend the Constitution have been introduced in Congress since 1789 (as of January 3, 2019).[4][7] Collectively, members of the House and Senate typically propose around 200 amendments during each two-year term of Congress.[8] Proposals have covered numerous topics, but none made in recent decades have become part of the Constitution. Historically, most died in the congressional committees to which they were assigned. Since 1999, only about 20 proposed amendments have received a vote by either the full House or Senate. The last time a proposal gained the necessary two-thirds support in both the House and the Senate for submission to the states was the District of Columbia Voting Rights Amendment in 1978. Only 16 states had ratified it when the seven-year time limit expired.[9]

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Every institution is incorporated. Every order given by anybody from those companies is an offer of contract. We can accept, or reject them.

"The expression 'the Crown' may refer either to the Sovereign in person or to the executive. In most constitutional discussions, it is used to refer to the latter and to the executive powers of the monarch in whose name many of the activities of government are carried on. In effect, the limitations on the powers of the Crown are now limitations on the powers of the political executive (the government). In this sense, the Crown has legal status as a corporation aggregate, embracing the state 'in all its activities'. The concept of a corporation aggregate predicates the Queen at the apex and includes all the departments of state. This concept overtook that of a corporation sole (denoting the King in person) under the greatly expanded functions of the modern state."   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ That's right the crown itself in it's actions is a corporation in its entire self and there are Limitations on their powers, lot's of them actually and there are plenty of opportunities available to us to reject their bs outright. If they get out of hand a subject may partition the King (queen nowadays) If a proclamation for such an action is declared all prosecutions and commitments on the subject becomes illegal until it is carried out. It's an old right but it's been used in modern times with success. There's other favourable ones also. Examples....

Right to petition

That it is the right of the subjects to petition the King, and all commitments and prosecutions for such petitioning are illegal:

No dispensing power

That the pretended power of suspending of laws, or the execution of laws, by regal authority, without consent of Parliament, is illegal:

Late dispensing illegal

That the pretended power of dispensing with laws, or the execution of laws, by regal authority, as it has been assumed and exercised of late, is illegal:

Levying money

That levying money for or to the use of the Crown, by pretence of prerogative, without grant of Parliament, for longer time or in other manner then the same is or shall be granted, is illegal:

Subjects’ arms

That the subjects which are Protestants may have arms for their defence suitable to their conditions, and as allowed by law:

Excessive bail

That excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted:

~~~~> Government individuals like to think they can just make up rules and laws as they go along and sometimes we have to put them in their place! by non compliance. 

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