Brussels Commission: EU Too White, Mass Third World Migration Must Be ‘New Norm’

http://12160.info/profiles/blogs/brussels-commission-eu-too-white-m...

Commission: EU Too White, Mass Third World Migration Must Be ‘New Norm’

18 Dec 2017
http://www.breitbart.com/london/2017/12/18/eu-white-mass-migration-...

Brussels has said that Europeans must accept mass migration from the third world as the “new norm”, warning that neither walls nor policies will allow any part of the EU to remain “homogenous and migration-free”.

“It’s time to face the truth. We cannot and will never be able to stop migration,” writes EU Commissioner for Migration Dimitris Avramopoulos, in a piece for POLITICO, published Monday entitled, “Europe’s Migrants Are Here to Stay”.

In it, the Eurocrat wrote “human mobility will increasingly define the 21st century”, and that mass migration is an issue Brussels has committed Europe to “for the long haul”, stating: “Migration is deeply intertwined with our policies on economics, trade, education and employment — to name just a few.”

Pointing to migrants from the world’s poorest countries who were granted refugee status in Europe, Avramopoulos made clear that Brussels sees asylum not as a way to offer temporary respite from war but instead as another method of permanently transplanting third world populations into EU nations.

“They have found safety in Europe, but we also need to make sure they find a home,” he writes of refugees, going on to insist that programming Europeans to welcome mass migration is “not only a moral imperative”, but “also an economic and social imperative for our aging continent — and one of the biggest challenges for the near future”.

To this end, the Commission is working to “enhance legal channels for economic migration with a more ambitious Blue Card for highly skilled workers and kick-start targeted labour migration pilot projects in key third countries”, he notes.

Whilst Brussels claims that the Blue Card will bring “highly-skilled workers” to Europe, Breitbart London reported last year that revisions to the scheme clearly contradict this, stating that it would be necessary to provide newcomers with education, employment, and vocational training.

Noting that people from non-European backgrounds living in Europe are much more likely to be unemployed or on low wages, the Commission even stressed that “integration measures” would be necessary for hosting the arrivals they claim are essential to the continent’s economies.

In the piece, the Greek politician also praised a series of POLITICO articles which accuse the EU of being “too white”, in which the bloc was urged to bring in measures which would encourage replacing native Europeans with “people of colour” in Brussels jobs.

But this, the migration commissioner said, is “not nearly enough to prompt the changes that our societies need to be ready for the realities of the 21st century”.

Avramopoulos, who last week shot down Council of Europe chief Donald Tusk’s suggestion to scrap the controversial migrant quota scheme forcing third world migrants on unwilling nations as “anti-European”, went on to make clear he believes that no corner of the EU can be exempt from mass migration.

“It is naïve to think that our societies will remain homogenous and migration-free if one erects fences,” he thunders, in a paragraph clearly aiming at nations in Central Europe, where leaders have fought against the imposition of third world migration.

“It is unwise to think that migration will remain on the other side of the Mediterranean, if one only shows solidarity in financial terms,” he continues. “It is foolish to think that migration will disappear if one adopts harsh language.”

“At the end of the day, we all need to be ready to accept migration, mobility and diversity as the new norm and tailor our policies accordingly.

“The only way to make our asylum and migration policies future-proof, is to collectively change our way of thinking first,” the migration commissioner concludes.

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Migrants keep warm with Red Cross blankets after arriving aboard a coast guard boat at Malaga's harbour on December 7, 2017 | Jorge Guerrero/AFP via Getty Images

Opinion

Europe’s migrants are here to stay

It’s time to start crafting our policies accordingly.


By

12/18/17, 4:00 AM CET

Updated 12/18/17, 9:17 PM CET


https://www.politico.eu/article/europe-migration-migrants-are-here-...

It’s time to face the truth. We cannot and will never be able to stop migration.

The refugee crisis in Europe may be subsiding, but migration globally will not stop. Today, on International Migrants Day, more than 244 million people are living outside their country of birth. Human mobility will increasingly define the 21st century. If we want to be ready for it, we need to start preparing now.

Migration is an emotional, sensitive and political issue. It has helped determine elections across Europe and the world. But we can no longer talk only about crisis management: Migration is our new reality. The time has come to start thinking, talking and acting about migration in a more comprehensive and long-term way, putting in place policies aimed at promoting integration and inclusion.

Over the last two years, Europe has been primarily engaged in addressing the immediate urgencies of the global migration and refugee crisis — and quite successfully so. Irregular flows have dropped by 63 percent. More than 32,000 refugees have been relocated within Europe. More than 25,000 people in need of protection have been resettled to the Continent, with another 50,000 expected to arrive in the next two years. And thousands of migrants have been helped on the ground in Libya in cooperation with international partners.

* * *

Of course, a lot still remains to be done in the European Union. We need to deliver on our promises to evacuate thousands of migrants from Libya either through resettlement or assisted voluntary return in the coming months. We need to reach a comprehensive and fair asylum reform by June. We must also enhance legal channels for economic migration with a more ambitious Blue Card for highly skilled workers and kick-start targeted labor migration pilot projects in key third countries.

But we cannot continue taking an ad hoc approach, thinking and acting with only short-term deadlines in mind. When it comes to migration, we’re in it for the long haul. This not a problem to solve or a challenge to address. Migration is deeply intertwined with our policies on economics, trade, education and employment — to name just a few.

Unfortunately, the recent discourse on migration — influenced by rising nationalism, populism and xenophobia — has limited our opportunities to put in place smart, forward-looking migration policies, at both the national and European levels.

It is foolish to think that migration will disappear if one adopts harsh language. It is naïve to think that our societies will remain homogenous and migration-free if one erects fences. It is unwise to think that migration will remain on the other side of the Mediterranean, if one only shows solidarity in financial terms.

We must start to be honest with those citizens who are concerned about how we will manage migration. We may not be able to stop migration. But we can be better, smarter and more proactive at managing this phenomenon. However, we cannot achieve this if we don’t accept a change in attitude and a change in our narrative.

The EU has granted protection to more than 700,000 people last year.

The EU has granted protection to more than 700,000 people last year. They have found safety in Europe, but we also need to make sure they find a home. This is not only a moral imperative. It is also an economic and social imperative for our aging continent — and one of the biggest challenges for the near future.

There has been some debate about diversity and inclusion recently — including through discussions initiated by POLITICO — but not nearly enough to prompt the changes that our societies need to be ready for the realities of the 21st century.

* * *

Integration and inclusion may sound like luxury discussions when the debate is focused on finding a fair agreement on the reforms of the Dublin regulations, which govern how asylum applications are processed in the EU.

But leaving these long-term considerations out of the conversation would be a mistake — one that we’ve made in the past and for which we are still paying the social and economic costs today.

At the end of the day, we all need to be ready to accept migration, mobility and diversity as the new norm and tailor our policies accordingly. The only way to make our asylum and migration policies future-proof, is to collectively change our way of thinking first.

Dimitris Avramopoulos is European commissioner for migration, home affairs and citizenship.

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